MINNESOTA

 

CANDIDATES

 

Tina Smith incumbent  for US Senate

Dan Feehan for Congress uS House of Representatives

Collin Peterson incumbent for Congress US House of Representatives

NOTES:

  1. MN Voter Registration Deadline. Oct 21, 15 days before Nov 3, 2020.

  2. Stage 3 -- No excuse required to vote by mail
  3. No online registration available

FAVORITES:

  1.  Act Blue Directory 

  2. Vote.org -- Everything about ever state

  3. Movement.vote/groups/ -- Help local, state orgs get out the vote

  4. Votevets.org -- Vets against voter suppression

  5. Votefwd.org -- Most popular way to volunteer to support getting out the vote

  6. VoteSaveAmerica.com -- Adopt a State

Voter Issues

JULY 2020

Minnesota: A state court judge has issued a ruling temporarily blocking Minnesota from enforcing certain limitations on who can assist voters with completing or submitting absentee ballots while the case awaits final adjudication. State law prohibits a person from aiding more than three voters with these tasks, which Democrats argued violated both the state constitution and federal law by discriminating against people with disabilities and naturalized citizens in need of translation assistance.

 

Minnesota: Minnesota officials have announced that they will not appeal a federal district court ruling from June that issued a preliminary injunction blocking a state law that would have listed Democrats last on the ballot in every partisan contest statewide in November after national Democrats sued. The court said that ballot order will be determined randomly for 2020, though the state's agreement with plaintiffs would give lawmakers a chance to change the law legislatively next year before the case proceeds further. As we've previously explained, being listed higher on the ballot can give candidates a modest boost, particularly in less-salient downballot races.

APRIL 2020

• Minnesota: On Tuesday, Democratic state senators proposed automatically sending all registered voters a ballot for this year's elections, but the chamber’s GOP majority quickly came out in opposition to the plan. Instead, Republican state Sen. Mary Kiffmeyer, who chairs the upper house’s Elections Committee, would only support expanding the state's existing no-excuse absentee mail voting option.

• Minnesota: Democratic Secretary of State Steve Simon has introduced legislation under which every Minnesota voter would automatically receive a mail-in ballot for the state's Aug. 11 down-ballot primaries and the November general election. Voters would be required to have someone witness their ballots. However, Republicans immediately expressed their opposition, meaning it's likely dead on arrival in the GOP-run state Senate.

MARCH 2020

• Minnesota: Democratic Secretary of State Steve Simon says that Minnesota is considering the possibility of conducting all voting by mail for its "2020 statewide elections," which presumably would include both the state's Aug. 11 downballot primaries and the November general election. As an alternative, Simon says officials may encourage voters to cast absentee ballots, a method that almost a quarter of the state used in 2018.

FEBRUARY 2020

• Minnesota: A state court judge has rejected a request by a conservative group to intervene in a lawsuit to defend Minnesota's ban on voting by people on parole or probation. The ACLU filed a challenge to this law last year; if it's successful, only people currently still incarcerated would remain unable to vote.

Conservative opponents of the lawsuit have accused Democratic Secretary of State Steve Simon and state Attorney General Keith Ellison of refusing to mount the most vigorous defense of the law possible. Democratic appointees hold a 5-2 majority on Minnesota's Supreme Court, and while that's no guarantee of success, it means there's a decent chance the ACLU will prevail if the case ultimately reaches the high court.

JANUARY 2020

 

• Minnesota: National Democratic Party organizations have filed a lawsuit in state court challenging Minnesota's restrictions on who can assist voters with completing or submitting their absentee ballots. State law prohibits a person from aiding more than three voters with these tasks, which Democrats argue is a violation of both the state constitution and federal law.

Democratic Secretary of State Steve Simon warned a state House committee earlier this month that these restrictions were likely to get struck down if they weren't repealed. With Democratic appointees holding a majority on Minnesota's Supreme Court, there's a good likelihood that he'll be proven right if the case proceeds that far.

©BOOMERS FOR DEMOCRACY